State Library of South Australia

Live & Learn series 2018

Date: 31 August 2018 to 7 December 2018

Time: 1 to 2:30pm

Location: Bronwyn Halliday Learning Studio (in the Hub)

Note: Free entry, bookings essential.

Live and learn Be intrigued and inspired by stories and images of South Australias past from the collections of the State Library

Discover our collections through monthly themed presentations that include stories, slides, access to special items from our collections and a tour of the Library.

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August | September | October | November | previous

 August: Marvellous Maps

Dates: 10 & 31 August & 7 December

This program will be held in the Jervois Room Mortlock Wing.
Discover the stories behind some of our South Australian maps, find out how to access them online, and go behind-the-scenes to the Map Collection in the Spence Wing.

Maps are wonderful things to look at. They tell stories of the land if you know what to look for. John McDouall Stuart's 1861 map pointed the way for Charles Todd's Overland Telegraph, while Goyder's Line in 1865 showed where not to farm. Detailed 19th century 'hundreds' maps are an invaluable resource for family historians, Among the other items we will look at are an 1838 shipboard diary with pen sketches of exotic lands and WH Edmunds' colourful road plans of the hills and metropolitan Adelaide from the 1920s and 40s.

As well as looking at the originals we will discover how to access them as digital images on the State Library's website and catalogue. Feel free to BYO device or use one of our Community Learning iPads.

We then visit the Mortlock Wing to see a range of maps and charts on display, and go behind-the-scenes to the Map Collection in the Spence Wing.

> Book online

 September: The Celestial Question: Early Chinese arrivals and settlers

Dates: 7 & 21 September

Be intrigued by stories and images of our Chinese heritage from our South Australian collections, be hands-on with some special collection items and visit the Mortlock and Spence Wings.

Discover the early history of the Chinese in South Australia. Mr Sang is believed to be the state's first Chinese settler. Very few followed him until gold fever struck Australia in the 1850s. To beat Victoria's poll tax, thousands of Chinese immigrants passed through South Australia, walking hundreds of miles to the gold diggings in Ballarat.

By the late 1870s there were a hundred Chinese South Australians and by Federation, almost 300, living mostly in Adelaide. Called Celestials, they worked as market gardeners, labourers, shopkeepers, carpenters, restauranteurs and herbalists. They often intermarried, raised families, went to Temple or Church, and somehow survived discrimination. Some went on to become highly successful merchants and entrepreneurs.

This program includes a close look at relevant special items from our collections and concludes with a short tour of the Library.

> Book online

 October: Finding Fashion: Frocks and finery in our collections

Dates: 5 & 19 October

Enjoy a slideshow of gorgeous images from our South Australian collections, be hands-on with some special collection items, and take a short tour of the Library.

South Australians have had a love affair with fashion since the early days of the colony. The State Library has a fabulous collection of historic South Australian resources relating to fashion, including. photographs, design drawings, magazines and archival documents. A slideshow of stunning images takes us through time, looking at costumes for the debutante ball, the beach and the races. Highlights include Thelma Afford's 1936 centenary costume designs, and images relating to fashion icons Elsa Schiaparelli and Diana, Princess of Wales.

A selection of resources will be available for hands-on viewing. We will also visit the historic Mortlock Wing, and discover where you can do your own research in the Spence Wing.

> Book online

 November: When Peace Descends: South Australians after the Armistice

Dates: 2 & 16 November

Discover the stories and images of the aftermath of World War One in our South Australian collections, be hands-on with some special collection items and take a short tour of the Library.

From the onset of World War One, Australian women responded with patriotic fervour and a determination to do their bit. As the war continued over four long years, death tolls rose, the wounded and maimed slowly returned and reality began to bite. In November 1918 came the Armistice and repatriation. And then what happened?

Using material from the Library's published, archival and online collections, we look at South Australian society in peacetime and the effects of loss, grief and war damage. Join us as we explore the aftermath of the 'war to end all wars', including services and aid for returned soldiers and nurses; support for women and their families; symbols of remembrance and local monuments.

This program includes a close look at relevant special items from our collections and concludes with a short tour of the Library.

> Book online


Previous events

February: Explore your State Library

Dates: 2 & 16 February

Be inspired by our vast collections of South Australian material gathered from colonial times to today.

Discover historical photographs, menus, diaries, letters, newspapers, maps, posters and films as well as books and magazines. You will have the unique opportunity to see some original materials close up. This program includes a 30 minute walking tour of our heritage buildings and a chance to view our current exhibitions.

March: Noble & Notorious: Forgotten women from Proclamation to WW1

Dates: 2 & 16 March

Be inspired by stories and images of forgotten South Australian women, be hands-on with some special collection items and take a short tour of the Library.

Why did Mary Thomas give up her bed for a printing press? What was it about the wealthy Mrs Herbert Fisher, aka Thistle Anderson, that both scandalised and entranced Adelaide society in the early 1900s? Why do 21st century South Australians owe so much to Mary Lee, Augusta Zadow and Kate Cocks? What terrible events placed Elizabeth Woolcock and Mary Schippan in the public eye? Why did all those WW1 soldiers love Mrs Seager?

Join us as we remember a few of South Australia's many forgotten women. Whether they were shining lights, sinners, or sinned against, their stories are well worth hearing. This program includes a close look at relevant special items from our collections and concludes with a short tour of the Library.

April: Stop Press: Newspapers in our history

Dates: 13 & 27 April

Enjoy stories and images from our South Australian collections, find out how to access newspapers online, and go behind-the-scenes to see newsprint turned into microfilm.

The history of our state's newspapers is a fascinating one, from Robert Thomas arriving with his printing press in 1836 to online access via Trove. A slideshow will bring our early newspaper history to life, including tales of the Register and South Australia's first salaried female journalist, Catherine Helen Spence. We will then discover how to access online newspapers and databases via the State Library website and catalogue with hands-on access to Community Learning iPads. Feel free to BYO device.

We will go behind-the-scenes to the Mortlock Wing basement where newsprint is turned into microfilm, and discover the access points to microfilm and other newspapers in the Spence Wing.

May: Ship Ahoy! Tales of shore & riverbank

Dates: 4 & 18 May

Marvel at our maritime history in a slideshow from our South Australian collections, be hands-on with some special collection items, and discover the shipping collections in the Spence Wing.

South Australia's maritime history is explored in a slideshow, highlighting the City of Adelaide clipper ship of 1864 which is now back in Port Adelaide. In stormy seas we are shipwrecked on the Admella and find the Library's connections with SS Titanic. In gentler waters we encounter rivercraft from paddle steamers to Popeye, and revisit childhood memories of classic books on boating.

A selection of Library resources will be available for hands-on viewing. Special items include historic shipboard diaries and menus, special collections of shipping photographs, rare books and a children's board game.

We will visit the Mortlock Wing to see images of bark canoes built by Indigenous Australians, view historic charts, then explore the Paul McGuire Maritime Library and other shipping resources in the family history area of the Spence Wing.

June: Researching your locality

Dates: 15 & 29 June

Discover how to research your older metropolitan neighbourhood or country town, be hands-on with some special collection items, and some local history resources in the Spence Wing.

As the repository of the state's documented history, the State Library is a great place to explore your older metropolitan neighbourhood or country town. Find out about the wide range of resources that you can use to build up a picture of your locality. These include postal directories, newspapers, maps, postcards, local histories and even Government Gazettes. Archival photographs, letters and diaries, and oral histories can also flesh out your local or family history.

Discover how to access many of these resources online via the State Library website and catalogue, using Community Learning iPads, or feel free to BYO device. We will also see these resources in the local and family history collections and services in the Spence Wing.

July: Devotion: Our World War One nurses

Dates: 13 & 27 July

Be inspired by stories and images of the nurses and aides of World War One, be hands-on with some special collection items and take a short tour of the Library.

When war was declared in 1914, thousands of men answered the call. So did hundreds of women, not as soldiers, but as nurses and aides. These women exhibited extraordinary devotion to duty, and to those they nursed. No wonder the WWI nurse was called 'the rose of no man's land'.

To our 21st century eyes, the conditions under which they worked were horrific. Yet as witnessed by their letters and diaries, many retained a sense of humour and grace despite the chaos. At war's end, these women came home to little recognition or support from government. Still they contributed their hard-won skills to the nursing profession and their communities. Their stories also deserve to be told.

This program includes a close look at relevant special items from our collections and concludes with a short tour of the Library.

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